Buffalo in 1910: ‘Furnishing Buffalo with the finest milk in the world’

By Steve Cichon
steve@buffalostories.com
@stevebuffalo

Imagine just-harvested milk sitting in barrels on farms, loaded onto uncovered carts to be taken to the hot boxcars of the nearest train.

That’s how milk was served in Buffalo 110 years ago, and it’s no wonder that such milk served as a breeding ground for strep, diphtheria, scarlet fever and other maladies.

While the new procedures implemented to keep milk a bit cooler hardly seem like enough by today’s standards, they were big advances in providing the city with healthier milk.

From July 10, 1910:

Published by

Steve Cichon

Steve Cichon is a proud Buffalonian helping the world experience the city he loves. writing about the people, places, and ideas that make Buffalo unique and special. The storyteller and historian has written six books, worn bow ties since the 80s, and is the News Director at WECK Radio. A 25 year Buffalo media veteran, Steve's contributed more than 1400 Buffalo History stories to The Buffalo News, worked at WIVB-TV, Empire Sports Network, and spent ten years as a newsman and News Director at WBEN Radio. He's also put his communication skills to work as an adjunct professor, a producer of PBS documentaries, and even run for Erie County Clerk. Steve's Buffalo roots run deep: all eight of his great-grandparents called Buffalo home, with his first ancestors arriving here in 1827.