Buffalo in the 50’s: Downtown, Black Rock First Ward, and The Fruit Belt in Color

Buffalo, NY – Here are dozens of beautiful photos showing downtown, areas along the Black Rock Canal that have been replaced with the 190, and photos of the Fruit Belt neighborhood devastated by the building of the 33 Expressway, great old downtown flicks, a few from the First Ward, and even some shots from “out in the country.”

These photos are mostly from 1957 & 1958.

Becky Harbison had a car trunk full of old slides rescued from the home of a relative, who obviously had a great love for some of the more interesting scenes around Buffalo in the late 50s.

Read more about William Harbison (and see a few more GREAT slide) here. We scanned in the slides, and here they are… Along with a few other slides I had laying around.

Church & Franklin
Church & Franklin
Cherry & Goodell
Cherry & Goodell
20a near Orchard Park
20a near Orchard Park
Thruway toll booths
Parkside-Zoo streetcar, Erie overpass
Downtown
Downtown
Lafayette Square, Kleinhans
Lafayette Square, Kleinhans
West Side Rowing Club
Washington at Virginia
Tug Oklahoma, Irving L Clymer. Black Rock Canal, 1957
South Wales Depot
Sewer Authority
Sacred Heart Academy Washington Street
Rt 16 in Holland
219– road to Bradford
Public School 15 from Ellicott Square Bulding
Ash & Genesee, Police Precinct 4
Old Police Barns
Ohio St, Louisiana St, St Clair St, First Ward
Niagara Section (I-190) anf Massachusetts Pumping Station
Michigan & South Park
Michigan & Scott
Michigan & Genesee
Massachusetts Ave Pumping Station
Goodell & Washington
Goodell & Washington
Goodell & Demond Alley Lux Funeral Home
Goode3ll & Demond Alley
Franklin & Court
Forest Lawn/Mt St Joseph Academy
Forest Lawn Millard Fillmore grave
Forest Lawn
Foot of Erie Street
Ferry Street from Gull Street
Foot of Ferry Street
Ferry St Bridge
Ferry St Bridge
Ferry St Bridge
Ferry St Bridge
Ferry St Bridge
Ferry St Bridge from Bird Island
Ferry St Bridge from Bird Island
Ferry St Bridge
Ferry St Bridge
Ferry Street and Rowing Club from Canada
Niagara St & Ferry St
Niagara St & Ferry St
Niagara St & Ferry St
Niagara St & Ferry St
Niagara St & Ferry St
Niagara St & Ferry St
Fairmont Creamery
Fairmont Creamery
Edmund P Smith
Edmund P Smith
Edmund P Smith
Edmund P Smith
Delaware & Huron
Delaware & Huron
County Hall, Delaware Ave Side
County Hall, Delaware Ave Side
Cotters Grill, First Ward
Cotters Grill, First Ward
Cotters Grill, First Ward
Cotters Grill, First Ward
Coal Dock from canal terminal
Coal Dock from canal terminal
Church & Franklin NFT Bus
Church & Franklin NFT Bus
Central Book Store
Central Book Store
Barge Robert M Trotter and tug at Black Rock
Barge Robert M Trotter and tug at Black Rock
SS Irvin L Clymer at Black Rock
SS Irvin L Clymer at Black Rock
Pioneer at Black Rock
Pioneer at Black Rock
Niagara Mohawk at Black Rock
Lydon at Black Rock
Lydon at Black Rock
HL Gobeille at Black Rock
HL Gobeille at Black Rock
Freighter at Black Rock
Freighter at Black Rock
Black Rock Canal at Ferry Street
Black Rock Canal at Ferry Street
Black Rock shoreline tug boat
Black Rock shoreline tug boat
Ball Brothers, Black Rock Canal
Ball Brothers, Black Rock Canal
Black Rock Canal
Black Rock Canal, Meyer Malt
Bird Ave at Soldiers Pl
Bird Ave at Soldiers Pl, Frank Lloyd Wright Heath House
Allegheny State Park
Allegheny State Park
Reformatted & Updated pages from staffannouncer.com finding a new home at buffalostories.com
Reformatted & Updated pages from staffannouncer.com finding a new home at buffalostories.com

Irv! Buffalo’s Anchorman: The Irv, Rick, and Tom Story…. A book by Steve Cichon

ABOUT THE BOOK:

The story of a TV anchorman so universally loved in Western New York that only one name is necessary… Irv. From the 1950s through the 1990s, Irv Weinstein informed and entertained generations of Buffalonians with his unmistakable style in writing and delivering the news. Together with Rick Azar and Tom Jolls, Irv was a part of the longest running TV anchor team in history, and their story is the story of Buffalo over the last half century.

From the time long ago… When our TV picture looked like it came from the bottom of a Coke bottle in fuzzy black and white, to today’s electronically augmented color; one man in Buffalo television has been the leading presence. As Clint Buehlman once dominated Buffalo radio, as Walter Cronkite dominated network news, so Irv, through his intuition, aggressive style, his personality, has dominated the local news scene. -Phil Beuth

Softcover, 74 historic photos, 148 pages.

BUY THE BOOK NOW: Buffalo Stories Bookstore

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Steve Cichon is an award-winning journalist, author, and historian. The Buffalo News calls him “A true Buffalonian,” and says “he knows this town.  The winner of a Buffalo Business First ‘40 Under 40’Award in 2010 and dozens of Associated Press Awards as an anchor and reporter with WBEN Radio since 2003, Steve has worked in radio and television in Buffalo since 1993.

When they went into the Buffalo Broadcasting Hall of Fame in 2000, I snuck behind the stage to get a photo with the greatest triumvirate in the history of Buffalo. They had no idea who I was. Ten years later, I wrote a book about them.
When they went into the Buffalo Broadcasting Hall of Fame in 2000, I snuck behind the stage to get a photo with the greatest triumvirate in the history of Buffalo. They had no idea who I was. Ten years later, I wrote a book about them.

Cichon’s 2009 book, ‘The Complete History of Parkside,’ was described by Western New York Heritage Magazine as ‘packed with numerous facts from start to finish, (A) fun read through one the city’s most beautiful residential neighborhoods.’ Steve and his wife Monica are the care takers of their 1909 EB Green home in the Parkside Neighborhood.

While Steve has spent years collecting the Irv Weinstein story, his interests also extend to the history of all of Buffalo and Western New York as well. He’s the curator, writer, and webmaster at staffannouncer.com, a website dedicated to preserving and sharing the Buffalo area’s pop culture history, particularly the history of Buffalo radio and television, and the numerous untold stories of everyday living on the Niagara Frontier.

Steve is available to talk about Irv, Rick, and Tom and many other Buffalo Pop Culture history subjects… Information on how by clicking here.

Buffalo in the 80’s: B-kwik Markets & RC Cola

By Steve Cichon
steve@buffalostories.com
@stevebuffalo

Buffalo Stories archives

The B-kwik Food Markets chain was a part of the Tops Friendly Markets family.

The stores were medium sized markets, between the large Tops stores and the small Wilson Farms stores.

My grandma lived a block away from the Seneca Street b-Kwik, my dad worked there when it was Food Arena. Living in North Buffalo, I shopped often at the Hertel b-Kwik, which was bought out by Dash’s.

Buffalo in the 70’s: John Corbett & Mr. Yuk

By Steve Cichon
steve@buffalostories.com
@stevebuffalo

Mr. Yuk is mean, Mr. Yuk is green.

Buffalo Stories archives

WBEN-TV’s John Corbett with Mr. Yuk in 1975.

Corbett anchored newscasts on Channel 4 through the 60’s and 70’s, and was a fixture on WBEN Radio hosting midday shows live from Hengerers, as well as afternoon drive show “Car and Kitchen.”

Mr. Yuk stickers were meant to warn small children about dangerous chemicals around the house– but wound up being something that some kids were attracted to instead of repulsed by.

Buffalo in the 1910’s: Steamers on the Great Lakes

By Steve Cichon
steve@buffalostories.com
@stevebuffalo

Buffalo Stories archives

It’s hard to fathom that so many big work, pleasure, and ferrying ships were steaming in and out of Buffalo not all that long ago.

Who wouldn’t love to “cruise” from the foot of Main street!

This is the Steamer Western States in steaming into Buffalo Harbor around 1900-1910.

Made in Buffalo, 1951: Manufacturing in Buffalo from Fortune Magazine

By Steve Cichon
steve@buffalostories.com
@stevebuffalo

BUFFALO, NY – For the second half of the twentieth century, industry was on a steady decline in Buffalo– but it was really at it’s height when Fortune Magazine did a 10-page cover story on manufacturing and the industrial might of Buffalo and Western New York in its July 1951 issue.

cover-1The Frederick Franck painting of Buffalo’s waterfront and downtown is great by itself, but the 27 photos of humming industry, almost half in color, and the rich accompanying text show the general sense of optimism about the future of the Niagara Frontier just after World War II.

There’s even a reference to one corporation deciding to build a factory elsewhere because there just weren’t enough people looking for work in Buffalo.

Outside of a few big names, many of the mid-sized factories that came and went here are all but forgotten to the collective memory. Buffalonians often use “Bethlehem Steel and GM” as shorthand for the providers of thousands of blue collar jobs that were once plentiful in Western New York.

And while those two giants may have employed 30,000 men here at the height of it, there were more hard working Western New Yorkers punching a clock in dozens and hundreds of other smaller factories. Large corporations and mom and pop outfits.

As you’ll read below, ‘the 200,000 factory workers (of Buffalo) make everything from pig iron to pretzel benders.’ It also says that Buffalo is heavily Polish, mostly Catholic, and anti-Red.

Just like many of you, my own family history is reflected in these photos. My great-grandfather worked at Westinghouse, my grandfather scooped grain at General Mills. My father-in-law worked for Hooker Chemical.

Of course, the mere mention of Hooker is a reminder of what a truly mixed blessing the high paying jobs of dirty industry was in so many cases. Western New York became ground zero for one of the first disasters to call attention to the disposal of toxic waste. The the company was found negligent, along with the City of Niagara Falls, in what was to become known simply as ‘Love Canal.’

Enjoy this look at Buffalo’s “fascinating industrial kaleidoscope,’ and make note that the photographer on this story was Victor Jorgensen, more famed for his V-J day shot of a sailor and nurse kissing in Times Square.

page1madeinbuffalo-1

 

Reformatted & Updated pages from staffannouncer.com finding a new home at buffalostories.com
Reformatted & Updated pages from staffannouncer.com finding a new home at buffalostories.com

The Old Latin Mass: Following along in church Pre-Vatican II

By Steve Cichon
steve@buffalostories.com
@stevebuffalo

Buffalo, NY – As the Catholic Church gets ready to make the first major changes to the Mass in a few generations, we now look back at the mass before the last big change, the granddaddy of ’em all… Those made at The Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican, usually known as Vatican II.

priest
There were many important, substantive changes made at that series of meetings held in Rome from 1962-65, but the one that had the greatest, most immediate effect on every day Catholics, was the introduction of vernacular languages into the Mass.

Up until 1967, Catholic Masses were still said in Latin, and were mostly said by a priest facing away from the congregation, and facing the tabernacle. The decisions made at the Vatican II opened up mass for more lay participation in the service, and allowed a greater number of people to take an active part by being able to listen and understand the Mass.

This missal, obviously meant for children, gives some great illustrations, the basic outline and explanation of the old Mass, and many of the old Latin responses that were changed to the ones that are about to be changed again now about four decades later. The book was necessary, because, again, nearly everything was said in Latin, and a young child certainly wouldn’t be able to follow along.

Remember Your Sunday Mass Missal? In a plastic binder like this one, you could carry a rosary, scapulars, prayer cards, and your missal
Remember Your Sunday Mass Missal? In a plastic binder like this one, you could carry a rosary, scapulars, prayer cards, and your missal

Note that the last page is a prayer to be said for those being persecuted in Russia. These prayers were added to the mass by Pope Pius X, and it was ordered that they be said in prayer for those in Soviet Russia by Pope Pius XI in the 1920s.I’m not sure where I picked up this particular book, but it was originally owned by George Clemens, who made his communion at Annunciation Church, Lafayette Avenue in Buffalo, in 1962. There was a George Clemens born in Buffalo in 1954, and died in 1987, living in the same zip code as Annunciation Church, so that could very well have been him. Again, I don’t exactly remember where this book came from, but it was likely with a pile of other things.

Why the Change?

In 1963, The Vatican Council decreed the following:

“[T]he rite of the Mass is to be revised … the rites are to be simplified, due care being taken to preserve their substance. Parts which with the passage of time came to be duplicated, or were added with little advantage, are to be omitted. Other parts which suffered loss through accidents of history are to be restored to the vigor they had in the days of the holy Fathers, as may seem useful or necessary. The treasures of the Bible are to be opened up more lavishly so that a richer fare may be provided for the faithful at the table of God’s word … A suitable place may be allotted to the vernacular in Masses which are celebrated with the people … communion under both kinds may be granted when the bishops think fit…as, for instance, to the newly ordained in the Mass of their sacred ordination, to the newly professed in the Mass of their religious profession, and to the newly baptized in the Mass which follows their baptism…”

The next year, biblical readings and the prayers of the faithful where introduced in local languages, as were the ‘Our Father,’ and other chants and parts of the Mass in which the people participated.

In 1967, the canon of the Mass was allowed to be said audibly, and in vernacular languages, and several of the vestments previously required of priests were made optional.

The Mass was further changed, to the service now familiar to most Catholics, in 1970.

Read more in a very thorough wikipedia article on The Tridentine Mass, also known as the Latin Mass.

Here at staffannouncer.com, we have dozens of church anniversary booklets, and other items from churches all over Western New York “on the pile” of great items to shared right here at your home for Buffalo’s pop culture memories.


Reformatted & Updated pages from staffannouncer.com finding a new home at buffalostories.com
Reformatted & Updated pages from staffannouncer.com finding a new home at buffalostories.com