Former Main Street institutions of the Parkside era now part of the Canisius campus

Parkside Historian Michael Riester puts forth the thesis, “As goes Main Street, so goes Parkside.” The following pages will take a look at Main Street in three separate sections: The institutions of the area, the automobile showrooms, and, finally the small businesses; the shops and storefronts where most people did most of their spending and … Continue reading Former Main Street institutions of the Parkside era now part of the Canisius campus

“The Main Street” near Parkside

Of course, following the rail and the streetcar to Parkside soon enough was the automobile. King’s Official Route Book was the Mapquest.com of the early automobile era. It gave new drivers not only street names as far as getting from one place to another, but offered landmarks as well in an era when street signs … Continue reading “The Main Street” near Parkside

Getting Around Parkside and Beyond

The Beltline Railway, which helped open up Parkside to development, was eventually too industrial for the sensitivities of the upwardly mobile new residents of Parkside to handle. One of life-long Parkside resident Bob Venneman’s earliest memories was of a 1918 freight train crash. He spoke of the crash with the Parkside News in 1988. The … Continue reading Getting Around Parkside and Beyond

The early businesses and churches of Parkside

Parkside had a different feel during this simpler time. There wasn’t a street in the neighborhood without a business of some sort. In many homes, the front parlor served as an office for doctors, dentists, and lawyers, and as a workshop for dressmakers, tailors and even a furrier. And that was just the businesses in … Continue reading The early businesses and churches of Parkside

The Growth of Parkside, 1890-1920

Buffalo’s population doubled in size between 1890 and 1930, and one of the city’s hottest new neighborhoods was there to help absorb the growth. Around the turn of the century, a Parkside address became very desirable, and unlike other parts of the city where a single developer or builder put up an entire neighborhood, in … Continue reading The Growth of Parkside, 1890-1920

Darwin Martin brings avant-garde architecture to Parkside

In 1902, the corner of Summit Avenue and Jewett Parkway saw construction begin on what was to become Parkside’s most famous landmark, as the complex of buildings designed by Frank Lloyd Wright for his great patron Darwin Martin began to rise from the earth. A prominent figure in the organization of the 1901 Pan American … Continue reading Darwin Martin brings avant-garde architecture to Parkside

Parkside develops around churches

Early Catholic Neighbors: St Vincent’s and The Sisters of St. Joseph While most of the earliest development inside what we know now as Parkside was an effort of mostly wealthy Protestant men, the Main Street corridor leading into the neighborhood was developed in large measure by the Roman Catholic Church. St. Vincent de Paul church … Continue reading Parkside develops around churches

Developing Olmsted’s Parkside

Residential Development came to Parkside as the area became easier to access. Main Street was paved in the 1830s, but it wasn’t until the extension of street car service from Cold Spring to the Park in 1879, and the completion of the New York Central Beltline Railway in 1883 that living in Parkside was really made … Continue reading Developing Olmsted’s Parkside

First a park, then a Parkside

Even as late as 1880, the area to soon be known as Parkside was still chiefly farm land, but an eye toward development had been sharply trained on the area for decades. Though most of the building in the neighborhood wasn’t to be completed until the first two decades of the 20th century; it was … Continue reading First a park, then a Parkside

Parkside after the War of 1812

Once peace was made, life slowed down considerably in the outlying area that was the Flint Hill/Parkside area; still 4-and-a-half miles north of the action of the village of Buffalo. And plenty of action there was. Through much political wrangling, the Village of Buffalo was selected as the terminus of the Erie Canal in 1825, … Continue reading Parkside after the War of 1812