WBZ’s Larry Glick, 1922-2009

By Steve Cichon
steve@buffalostories.com
@stevebuffalo

Did you ever win a Glick University T-shirt? Are you a Glicknick?

My fascination with the Glick Program started when my family spent three years  in Holliston, Massachusetts in the mid 80s, when Larry was doing afternoon drive on WBZ.

glickwbz

I was a pint-sized Glicknick and just mesmerized by the show. After Larry had left WBZ for WHDH, I had the chance to visit the WHDH studios, and wistfully remember seeing LARRY GLICK’S DESK– a great moment in a young life.

photo from the WBZ 75th anniversary booklet
photo from the WBZ 75th anniversary booklet

It might have been Larry’s multi-lingual sign-off as he went into the Peter Meade Show which encouraged me to study three foreign languages in high school and college.  And of course, there was that whistle and singing of the phone numbers (both of which you can hear at the 13:54 portion of the Glick Show below.)

No need to call 254-5678…                               Just click for LARRY!

Larry’s Bio as it appeared on the WMEX website when he worked at the station briefly in 2000:

Larry Glick is a Nationally known Radio Personality and a well known Boston area night club performer, especially for his hypnosis performances. Larry has been heard in 38 states as a radio personality, and he was a part of WMEX from 1964 to 1968. Larry was also a part of WBZ from 1968 to 1988, and a part of WHDH from 1989 to 1993. As well as the owner of an All Girl AM Station, Larry was a pioneer in becoming an owner of an FM station in Florida during the 1950s. He was also a major night time personality at WIOD (CBS) in Miami for several years before moving to the Boston Market. Larry is followed nationwide by all his GlickNick’s, and his popular show is a great addition to WMEX.

The Commander’s death was announced on WBZ’s website Friday, March 27, 2009.

Boston (WBZ Newsroom) — A Boston radio legend has died.

Longtime WBZ radio host Larry Glick died Thursday night in Florida after undergoing 10 hours of open heart surgery. He was 87.

Glick graced WBZ’s airwaves for 20 years, building up a faithful group of fans known as “Glicknics.”

Larry and WBZ-TV’s Jack Williams (right) had been close friends since 1975. Jack made frequent appearances on Larry’s talk show on WBZ.

Larry retired to Florida, where he most recently worked as a greeter at Legal Sea Foods in Boca Raton.

Glick leaves his wife Lisa and a daughter Tali, both in Florida, and a daughter, Nannette in the Boston area. Rest in Peace, Larry!

Reformatted & Updated pages from staffannouncer.com finding a new home at buffalostories.com
Reformatted & Updated pages from staffannouncer.com finding a new home at buffalostories.com

Random things about a random guy

By Steve Cichon | steve@buffalostories.com | @stevebuffalo

Originally posted on Facebook February 8, 2009

This is not the order I thought of these things. I didn’t number them either.

My Name: Steven Julius Cichon. Despite the fact that my dad’s name is Steven, I was named after my mom’s grandfather, Stephen Julius Wargo. Steven is spelled like my dad, though, so there you go. Cichon is a Polish name, and is pronounced CHEEhoyn in Polish. It means quiet person, hermit.

I think my basic purpose in life is to use my gift of seeing the absurd, ironic, and silly in most situations to make people smile. I love to do it. On the rare occasion when something I say hurts people, it really cuts me deep, and stays with me forever. Thinking about those times right now is giving me a stomach ache.

I am writing a book on the History of the Parkside Neighborhood. It’s been a tiring, but absolutely amazing experience.

Saving junk is in my blood. Great Grandpa Wargo, Grandma& Grandpa Coyle, Grandma Cichon, and my mom are all savers. Of crap. Just crap. Grandma Cichon started taking me to the Salvation Army and garbage picking before I could spell “Thrift Store.” But I think the biggest reason I save crap: My dad doesn’t save ANYTHING. When I was little, he’d always start stories with, “I wish I had it to show to you…” That stuck.

I had the best childhood anyone could ask for. We had very little money, but I have two great parents, and 5 wonderful grandparents (including Great Grandpa Wargo.) I never heard any of them really speak ill of any of the others. I now know some of them kept a smile on for the kids, and withheld some maybe snippy comments (even ones that I make now.) That makes it all the more special in retrospect.

I include my in-laws in my family. There is no “in law.” I was welcomed into my wife’s family, and extended family, I love each of them as if we all had the same blood running through our veins. I’m bowled over with the luck I have in both the family that came with the package, and the one I picked.

I met my wife, in the hallways of WBEN Radio, probably right around 5:30 on a Sunday morning in 1993. I was behind the controls, she was reading the news. She didn’t speak to me that morning, because she was painfully shy. Now she never shuts up. Just kidding, but I am thankful and happy for her that she has pretty much gotten over that.

WARNING: Have an air sickness bag handy… My wife is my best friend, and in many ways, my only friend. This isn’t to say we live in some fairy tale… We do well together, even though we know how to press each others buttons and do frequently. I think that makes our relationship all the stronger, though.

I have Celiac Disease, which means I can’t eat wheat, barley, or rye. No beer. No pizza. No fast food or processed food. It forces me to eat healthier, but I loved fast food. Not lots, but I could have a small hamburger and an order of chicken nuggets everyday, really enjoy it, and then eat properly the rest of the day. Now I eat a lot more, just trying to find something as tasty and satisfying as a Wendy’s 89 cent hamburger.

I also have Psoriatic Arthritis. Sometimes my legs hurt so bad by the end of the day, they almost stop working, but I’m about to go on a medication that wipes out the disease, almost entirely, in 80% of people who take it. The sad thing is, while I’m excited about the prospect of seeing the arthritis go away, I’m secretly.. almost equally… excited that my disgusting psoriasis fingernails might grow into normal looking nails.

In November, my wife and I began eating better, and working out at least 4 or 5 times a week… Intense cardio. I feel much better, and wish that I had begun doing it years ago. The YMCA on Delaware Ave in Buffalo is cheap and wonderful.

I frequently step back from my own life, and normal human life, and realize how silly and random so many things we do are on the face of it. Why do I have an animal living in my house? My job is to take information that almost anyone can track down, re-write it, and speak it into a microphone so it can fly through the air into your car. Trying to explain these things to an Martian might be tough.

I have very realistic and vivid dreams. On occasion, I remember something somewhat sketchy, and I’m not sure if I happened or I dreamed it. I’ll think about it and if Ed Little is on a horse in my living room, it was probably a dream.

I work better under deadline pressure, especially with projects in my personal life, or volunteer projects. I abhor being late. If I say I’ll get something done, I do. And I don’t appreciate those whose own lack of caring about deadlines makes me late.

I love church music, and I love to sing it loud. Even though I can’t sing. Even out of church. On Eagles Wings. And yes, “make me a channel of your peace,” (The Prayer of St Francis).

I’m a lector a St. Mark’s…. 9:30 mass… every 3rd Sunday. I’m sometimes afraid I might be singing too loudly too close to the microphone.

I like to build stuff, sew stuff, design stuff. But I’m not very good at it. Or maybe I just don’t have the patience to take the time to do those things right.

I am my own worst critic on everything.

I still think this is stupid, but it was cathartic. And have read every single word of each of my friend’s lists, so fair is fair.

12th annual class of the Buffalo Broadcasting Hall of Fame

By Steve Cichon
steve@buffalostories.com
@stevebuffalo

This was originally published in Forever Young Magazine

Roger Baker 2008 Golden Age of Broadcasting Award
Roger Baker
2008
Golden Age of Broadcasting Award

One of the original superstars of Buffalo Radio in the 20s and 30s for the Buffalo Broadcasting Corporation on WGR and WKBW, Baker was the Queen City’s first definitive sportscaster.

Those who remember him in the sports booth remember the ultimate professional– no focus on personality, so much as the product on the air. Calling Bisons games in the 30s from Offermann Stadium, he was straight, and by the book.

After being tapped by Baseball Commissioner Kenesaw Mountain Landis to call the 1933 World Series to a nationwide audience on CBS, Baker landed a job in Cincinnati calling the National League Reds on WLW.

After the war, Baker returned to Buffalo, reading news on WKBW Radio, but eventually moving into the General Manager’s office at the short-lived Buffalo UHF pioneer WBES-TV–where he also read news.

Along with Bill Mazer, Baker was also an original member of the WGR-TV sports team when the station signed-on in 1954. Baker moved to Albuquerque, New Mexico for health reasons, continuing his broadcast at KOB for several more years.

 

John DiSciullo
John DiSciullo

John entered his first TV studio as a boy with his grandma in Philly to watch a taping of the Mike Douglas Show. It was the most fun he’d seen adults have, ever, and he was hooked. A decade later, his early mentor Dave Thomas (A TV icon in both Buffalo and Philly), sent the fresh out of college DiSciullo up to his hometown for an interview at his old stopping grounds, Channel 7. That was 1982.

Save a few weeks since then when he tried his hand at producing TV in New York in 1988, he’s been at 7 Broadcast Plaza as a driving force behind AM Buffalo and The Variety Club Telethon, while keeping busy with everything from news, to promotions, to programming. In an age where telethons and locally originated TV talk shows might seem like a vestige of the past for some, DiSciullo points to his two pet projects as examples of how, with plenty of pure passion and a lot of fighting and kicking along the way, doing the right thing on television can continue to have a positive impact on the community.

The Goodyear Award is named in honor of George Goodyear, the Buffalo philanthropist who co-founded WGR-TV, and is awarded each year to those in Broadcasting’s front office who have made a career of advancing the ideals of the Buffalo Broadcasters

Pat Feldballe
Pat Feldballe

The name would leave most wondering, but the smooth, consistent voice is one you’re unable to escape in Buffalo. From Channel 2’s promo pieces to Valu Home Centers and Paddock Chevrolet, on on-hold messages, to the national Time/Life commercials, for a quarter century, Pat Feldballe has been Western New York’s go-to independent voice-over king.

In 1970s we all heard him at WBUF, WGR, WGRQ, and WUWU playing rock ’n’ roll and hosting a magazine program (and working with Terry Gross) at WBFO. He eventually got the point when he’d show up for his jock shift and find a handful of production orders taped to the console for him to do.

Figuring it was his destiny, he did a stint as a radio production director, but quickly decided, in 1982, that he could do production on his own. He hasn’t looked back.

In an industry where many production guys will try to sell clients on the latest and greatest gadget, Feldballe has used the same microphone since 1986. It’s a part of all his success.

“I’m the most consistent guy I know. I always sound the same, and I take pride in making sure reads time out,” says Feldballe. He’s the best at showing up and doing the work, doing it well, and making it easy for whoever is using his work. “I just hung out the shingle 27 years ago, and here I am.”

 

Ron Jaworski Buffalo Bob Smith Award
Ron Jaworski
Buffalo Bob Smith Award

His fate at the man who’d become the “The Polish Rifle” was sealed just before his senior year at Lackawanna High School. Drafted to play baseball at 17, he wanted to forget college to have a shot to play with Bob Gibson and the St. Louis Cardinals. But two weeks of a real Buffalo summer job of bending rods in a steel mill was enough motivation to get an education.

A standout at Youngstown State, Jaws played 17 years in the NFL for 4 teams, including the Philadelphia Eagles, where he was he 1980 NFL MVP. He also backed up Dan Marino for 2 seasons with the Miami Dolphins. But no matter where he played, and now, no matter from which city he analyzes Monday Night Football, Ron hasn’t forgotten his years as a season ticket holder at the Rock Pile, and certainly hasn’t forgotten his friends and family in Lackawanna.

His compatriots on the ESPN MNF staff are just glad he hasn’t forgotten where the good wing joints are.

Named after one of Buffalo’s most famous sons, the Buffalo Bob Smith Award is given to broadcasters with local roots who made his or her mark away from the Niagara Frontier, but is still a Buffalonian at heart.

 

Barry Lillis
Barry Lillis

Always wearing a smile like no other, Barry’s best known for his 20 years (1976-96) in front of WGRZ-TV weather maps. But that earnest grin, and the personality that went along with it, also made Barry a natural as the local host for annual the MDA telethon, and well as the Kids Escaping Drugs Campaign, which Barry himself named in 1987.

Just before Barry left the air in 1994, he was ordained an Orthodox Catholic Priest. To this day, much of his ministry involves counseling those battling drug and alcohol dependence. Its a challenging and rewarding vocation, which is often helped along by those thousands of weather forecasts where Barry made it feel like he was trying to make just you smile.

Often someone will say they remember the time he wore a t-shirt promoting their scout troop’s soup dinner on TV. People love to share memories of Barry’s zany overnight presentation of poorly lipsynched movies on Barry’s Cats Pajamas. But for Fr. Barry, it means so much more; maybe opening a door to help someone else along in life. It makes his career in broadcasting one of Buffalo’s most special ever.

 

Bill Stachowiak 2008 Behind the Scenes Award
Bill Stachowiak
2008
Behind the Scenes Award

Bill’s love of electronics growing up led him to broadcasting in college, where he was the college station’s chief engineer. That, he thought, was the end of radio business for him, which he lived and breathed as a kid. He started a business that did use his engineering background, however, selling and installing two-way and CB radio equipment for companies around WNY.

His voyage back into radio started with a tour of WPHD in 1979, where PD Harv Moore decided he was the right fit to fill an open engineering job. Since taking that job, Bill’s run his own broadcast engineering firm, building studios and performing maintenance all over New York state and all over the country, often explaining to someone hundreds of miles away over the phone how to fix what’s wrong.

Its a story made more incredible when you find out he did all of that without sight. Bill is blind. “I realize I have limitations, but made my mind up to live like everyone else. I was scared when all the sudden I was responsible for two stations (in 1979), but I rely on memory a lot, and I’ve had the help of a lot of great people over the years.” And a lot of people have relied on, and rarely been disappointed with Bill.

The Behind the Scenes Award celebrates the many people who make any broadcast possible, but don’t usually get the credit: The directors, producers, photographers, writers, engineers and office staff.



2008-Art Wander 120Those of you who know the him as “Artie Baby Boo-Boo, The Tiny Tot of the Kilowatt,” as Art might say: Wait a minute, wait a minute, wait a minute! As a kid growing up on Buffalo’s East Side, Art would ditch school to watch Foster Brooks and Buffalo Bob Smith do their WGR show live from Grant’s Department Store.

After a stint in the Navy, Art was the Radio Director for the VA Hospital, before landing at WKBW in 1956, where he eventually joined the news staff as a Pulsebeat Newsman under the direction of Irv Weinstein. By the late 1960’s, Art had programmed radio stations all around the country, including WOR-FM in New York, where he met the Beatles and became close with their manager Brian Epstein. Its this work done in music radio where Art feels more accomplished.

He’d return to Buffalo in the early 80s, first to program, but then to talk sports on 1400-AM. After Bills General Manager Bill Polian told Art to “get out of town,” he was picked up by WGR and later Empire Sports Network to talk sports. He always pictured his show as guys in a barroom. And opinions could be right, wrong, or indifferent, so long as they were entertaining.

 

Elephants roaming Parkside… Really!

By Steve Cichon
steve@buffalostories.com
@stevebuffalo

On my way to church Sunday morning, I was making the right onto Jewett Parkway from Parkside Avenue, and there they were– the elephants from the zoo were eating maple tree branches right off the trees on the edge of the Buffalo Zoo parking lot!

The handlers say the “helicopters” on the maple trees are like candy for them. These three elephants are all babies and that this was the farthest they’d walked outside the elephant house.

It’s a bit reminiscent of a story that happened  in the ’20s or ’30s, when Frank the Elephant walked out of the zoo unnoticed, and made his way almost to Hertel Avenue before being brought back to his home at the zoo.

Just another great reason to love living in Parkside!

Photos taken with my Motorola Razr flip phone.

Buffalo Morning Radio around the dial in 1989

By Steve Cichon
steve@buffalostories.com
@stevebuffalo

Don Postles... NewsCenter 2.It was a NewsCenter 2 sweeps week special series… Don Postles visited with the most popular radio personalities. It opened with an explanation of how Buffalo’s morning radio choices had just been radically changed when two former KB Staffers– Sandy Beach and Danny Neaverth– found new homes along the dial.

In wonderfully cheesy 80s TV style, this was graphically represented by two heads moving along an analog radio dial.

Sandy had left KB only a few years ago, and stopped at Hot 104 WNYS before heading to Majic 102 WMJQ.

When KB went satellite, Danny went to WHTT after Sandy left. Snortin Norton and 97 Rock had also recently returned after an absence of a few years.

All the moves help to make Bill Lacy and WBEN number one in Morning Drive. NewsCenter 2’s Don Postles met with each of these jocks… Plus WPHD’s team of Taylor & Moore.

All told, the 5 part series is a nice snapshot of Buffalo Radio in 1989.

 

Remembering Mr. Dressup

By Steve Cichon
steve@buffalostories.com
@stevebuffalo

Steve and the Tickle Trunk
I visited the tickle trunk at the CBC museum before the place was closed after budget cuts.

As I write this, I wonder how much of my bizarre personality can be attributed to the late great Ernie Coombs, known to Canadian Children (and those like me just over the border) as Mr. Dressup.

The daily half hour filled with drawing, creating cool stuff out of things that I had laying around the house, Dressing up in costumes, and using funny voices always set my imagination into motion.

This is me at the CBC museum… Just inches away from the tickle truck. My wife and I were also able to visit Mr. Dressup’s drawing easel, and Casey’s tree house (as well as The Friendly Giant’s castle).
stevegregxmas79Mr. Dressup was a 10:30 appointment for most of my childhood. My brother Greg and I would stop fighting the moment we heard the piano open on the show (this picture is of us Xmas ’79).

And we’d sit together on a big chair and be quiet for the half hour. My sister Lynne soon joined our love for Mr. Dressup too.

In true Mr. Dressup fashion, the Cichon kids made our very own Tickle trunk… We drew flowers on an empty beer case box, and stored our dress up gear in it. It seemed that just about every other day, the show ended with either Mr. Dressup or Casey asking about lunch… which then made us start bothering my mom about lunch, too.

Included here are some stills from the Mr. Dressup special that aired on CBC after his death in 2001, as well as some from a Casey and Finnegan episode that I taped in the late 80s or early 90s.

I’m glad that even after his death Mr. Dressup lives on every day on TV (even if without Casey and Finnegan.) It’s the finest kids show I’ve ever seen. It’s fun and spurs kids to be creative and think… without being preachy.


Reformatted & Updated pages from staffannouncer.com finding a new home at buffalostories.com
Reformatted & Updated pages from staffannouncer.com finding a new home at buffalostories.com

Celebrating 60 Years of Buffalo Television

By Steve Cichon
steve@buffalostories.com
@stevebuffalo

60 Years of Buffalo TV

Featuring over 2 dozen current and vintage Buffalo Television logos, this fundraiser for the Buffalo Broadcasters and the Preservation of Buffalo Television History was made possible through the cooperation of Buffalo’s Television stations, The Buffalo Broadcast Pioneers, and staffannouncer.com.

A great way to celebrate 60 years of Buffalo Television History, and help save it at the same time.

This 11×17 poster is printed in full-color on archival heavy 80lb gloss stock, and will be delivered in a mailing tube.


Reformatted & Updated pages from staffannouncer.com finding a new home at buffalostories.com
Reformatted & Updated pages from staffannouncer.com finding a new home at buffalostories.com

Buffalo in the 70’s: WYSL/WPHD Album Charts and Jock Pics

By Steve Cichon
steve@buffalostories.com
@stevebuffalo

Buffalo, NY – Ranging from 1971-1979, these singles and album charts from WYSL and WPhD are a great snapshot of what Buffalo was listening to musically and on the radio in the 70s.

And as far as the jock photos– let’s just say we all looked great in the 70s. Thanks to Paul, who gave me most of these charts for “safe keeping” a few years back.

 

Robert W Taylor, Crystal Beach
1977
Tom Tiberi– Slick Tom, ad for the first World’s Largest Disco. August 25, 1979.
August 25, 1979.
Jim Nowicki, August 11, 1979
August 11, 1979
August 11, 1979
Dean Matella wearing an “I love You Buffalo” t-shirt. Wear a MILK Mustache ad. August, 1979
August, 1979
Jim Nowicki, July 1979.
July 1979.
Nancy Miller, May 1979
May 1979
Tom Tiberi, May 1979
May, 1979
Chuck Stevens, April 1979
April 1979
Dino in the Morning April 1979
April 1979
Kevin Hines, Club 747 ad for the first computerized disco, April 1979
April 1979
Chuck Stevens March 1979
March 1979
Dino in the morning March 1979
March 1979
Nancy Miller March 1979 14 Rock WYSL Non Stop Music
March 1979
Kevin Hines March 1979
March 1979
Jim Nowicki Feb 1979
Feb 1979
Nancy Miller Feb 1979
Feb 1979
Dean Matela, Dec 1978
Dec, 1978
Nancy Miller, Oct. 1978
Oct. 1978
Robert W. Taylor
Sept. 1978
Jim Nowicki
Aug 1979
Nancy Miller
Larry Norton July 1979
July 1978
Jim Scott, June 1978
June 1978
John Piccillo JP, June 1978. Milk Mustache I Love You Buffalo t-shirts
June 1978
Larry Norton, May 1978
May 1978
Harv Moore May 1978, American Top 40
May, 1978
John Piccillo, April 1978
April 1978
March 1978 Rick Arnay
March 1978
Bill Potter Jan. 1978
Jan. 1978
Tom Atkins 1977 American Top 40
1977
JP John Piccillo November 1977
November 1977
Rick Arnay October, 1977
October, 1977
John Piccillo, Crystal Beach ad. September, 1977
September 1977
Craig Matthews, June 1977
June 1977
Chuck Stevens June 1977
June 1977
Kenny Davis May 1977
1977
Kenny Davis April 1977
April 1977
Robert W. Taylor 1977
April 1977
Harv Moore April 1977
April 1977
Sean Grabowski 1977
February 1977
Grabowski October 1976
October 1976
Grabowski October 1976
October 1976
Jim Scott, September 1976
September 1976
Harv Moore, July 1976
July 1976
John Piccillo WYSL, “Laverne & Shirley Sing” 1975
Grabowski
1976
1976
Robert W Taylor 1976
Robert W Taylor 1976
1976
1976
Robert W Taylor 1976
Robert W Taylor 1976
1975
1975
Grabowski, 1975
Grabowski, 1975
Jim Scott, 1975
1975
1975
Tom Tiberi, 1979. Burger King at Main & Utica, Just Opened!
Tom Tiberi, 1979. Burger King at Main & Utica, Just Opened!
1979
1975
Kevin O'Connell. WYSL, 1971
Kevin O’Connell. WYSL, 1971
WYSL 1971
WYSL 1971
WYSL, 1971
WYSL, 1971
Jack Evans WYSL
WPHD 1979
WPHD 1979
WPHD 1979
Taylor & Moore, WPHD 1979
May 1978
May 1978
Jim Nowicki, May 1978
Jim Nowicki, May 1978

 

Reformatted & Updated pages from staffannouncer.com finding a new home at buffalostories.com
Reformatted & Updated pages from staffannouncer.com finding a new home at buffalostories.com