Buffalo in the 70s: Fewer than 2% of city cops are black

By Steve Cichon
steve@buffalostories.com
@stevebuffalo

Buffalo’s only black police captain — one of only 25 black officers in the city — said having more men of color policing the neighborhoods predominantly inhabited by people of color would help solve many issues.

In 1970, Buffalo had 1,400 police officers and 25 (1.7 percent) were black. Department of Justice figures say in 2013, Buffalo had 714 officers, and 29 percent (about 207) were minorities.

Buffalo in the 60’s: Buffalonians march here as Rev. King marches in Selma

By Steve Cichon
steve@buffalostories.com
@stevebuffalo

Weeks of murders, beatings and unjust arrests led up to the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s march from Selma, Ala., to Montgomery, Ala.

In support of the events in Alabama, somewhere between 3,000 and 4,000 people rallied at Lafayette Square on March 14, 1965 — days after Dr. King was arrested, but days before the most famous, third Selma march. Arthur Eve led protesters in a march to Buffalo’s Federal Courthouse after speeches decrying racial injustice and inequity in this country.

Two days later in Buffalo– in sympathy with those whose march was stopping in Selma– 300 protestors trudged through snow, ice and cold temperatures as they walked from Lackawanna to Niagara Square, on March 14, 1965.

These photos were reprinted in The Buffalo News twenty years ago this week.